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The Pope of Brembo

Brembo is an Italian manufacturer with automotive brake system production, especially for high-performance bicycles based in Bergamo, near Milan. Brembo was first established in Bergamo, Italy in 1961. Soon after the company was formed, specialized in manufacturing disc brakes, which were imported from England at the time. The company signed a supply contract with Alfa Romeo in 1964. It became a brake component supplier for Moto Guzzi in 1966.

In the 1980s, Brembo began supplying other well-known automotive manufacturers namely BMW, Chrysler, Ferrari, Mercedes-Benz, Nissan and Porsche. The company went public from the Milan Stock Exchange in 1995.

The company’s headquarters are located in Bergamo, and the company has more than 6,000 employees in Italy and in branches in Brazil, China, Japan, Mexico, the United States, Poland, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom.

Brembo is believed to be a racing player, because his quality has been proven to be top. They have the “Pope” aka the highest master in brake technology, namely Eugenio Gandolfi, professor of brakes who often appears on the MotoGP paddock. The ability of Brembo brakes to stop vehicles even now is not yet pol, only 50%. Brembo itself has a central factory in Curno, near Bergamo. It is located between the Milan-Venice motorway. In this factory, work demands are very high. At the “Kilometro Rosso” factory which has 230 employees, there are car and motorcycle brake parts.

In this place also produced first-class alloy wheels, Marchesini, which in 2002 was annexed by Brembo. As many as 100 people from the total employees at the factory in Curno are taking care of the brakes for racing! They develop, test and produce brakes that are used for competition. This factory also has 18 brake testing stands. They are very concerned about durability and brake characteristics. So, the brakes are indeed gripping, but as continuous use causes the temperature to rise, the brakes can slowly lose their biting power. This is what was studied here. A brake series is also tested first up to 100 thousand times the pressure of the brake lever, before it is declared ripe to be used as a mass product. After that, Brembo sent 10 of their testers to test this brake.

Brembo, the brakes used on MotoGP bikes are also different from ordinary bikes. A motor that can accelerate very fast and has a top speed of more than 350 km / hours requires a reliable brake device as well.

Brembo himself revealed some of the facts in a video that we want to explain. First on the special brake master on the front that can provide pressure up to 9 kg. In addition, the distance playing the front brake lever can also be adjusted according to the will of the driver.

Interestingly again, the control panel is placed on the left side with the aim of the racer can set the distance to play the brake lever without having to remove the gas sleeve or remove the standby finger on the brake lever. Understandably, in a MotoGP class race off the gas sleeves in a matter of seconds has made a big loss for racers.

The brake master is also equipped with a special reservoir that can hold 5-15 cc of brake fluid. Moving to the bottom, the brake caliper used is a monoblock type equipped with 4 pistons. Well, the MotoGP motorbike uses two calipers which are placed on the left and right of the rim. Interestingly, the brake lining used is also very special.

Made with carbon so it only weighs 350 grams. This brake lining can work up to a maximum temperature of 900 degrees Celsius. Likewise with discs that are also made using carbon materials.

Just like brake lining, carbon-based discs can be used up to temperatures of 900 degrees Celsius.

Evolution of MotoGP Disc Brake

Brembo MotoGP disc brakes in 1980

In 1980 Brembo used disc brakes or plasma-coated aluminum discs to reduce weight in the 125 cc and 250 cc classes. Although it has the advantage of light weight, disc brakes or discs of this type have the disadvantage of not being able to withstand very high temperatures during braking friction and short service life.

Brembo MotoGP disc brakes in 1985

In 1985 Brembo developed a disc brake using a floating system, where in the middle it uses aluminum material while on the edges that rub against the brake lining using cast iron material, these two parts are united with the rivet system and are not related to each other other. This technology is an improvement of the brake disc or brake discs with aluminum material, especially resistance to high temperatures and a longer service life despite greater weight.

Brembo MotoGP disc brakes in 1990

In 1990 Brembo refined the brake device by developing a disc brake or a brake disc using a floating system, where in the middle and edges that rub against the brake lining using stainless steel material, these two parts are united with the rivet system and are not related to each other other. This technology has the advantage of resistance to high temperatures and a longer service life and lighter weight.

Brembo MotoGP disc brakes in 2000

In 2000 Brembo began using carbon materials to make disc brakes. The technology is still the same as using a floating system, where in the middle it uses stainless steel while on the edges that rub against the brake pad using carbon material. This technology has the advantage of resistance to high temperatures and very light weights, but has the disadvantage of a shorter service life. This technology is used for the 500 cc and MotoGP classes, but has also been applied in the 250 cc class.

Brembo MotoGP disc brakes in 2014

In 2014 Brembo began to develop again the brake disc or brake discs made from carbon materials. The technology is still the same as using a floating system, where in the middle it uses stainless steel while on the edges that rub against the brake pad using carbon material, but this time Brembo adds a surface area rubbing against the brake pad to produce better braking performance to match racing style of each MotoGP racer such as late braking and anticipating the top speed of the MotoGP motorbike which is even higher can reach 350 KM / Hour. This technology has the advantage of resistance to high temperatures and very light weight, but has the disadvantage of a shorter service life and this technology is used in the MotoGP class to date.

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