Categories
Uncategorized

History of Triumph

History of Triumph

The triumph of a British motorcycle manufacturer named Triumph Motorcycles began in 1883, when a man named Siegfried Bettmann moved to Coventry, England from the city of Nuremberg, Germany.

At first Bettmann did not directly make a motorbike manufacturing factory, but instead an import-export company by the name of the company S. Bettmann & Co. Import Export Agency. Bettmann imported sewing machines from Germany and also had a side business selling a badged bicycle named “Bettmann”.

In 1887, a company run by Bettmann underwent a transformation, Bettmann changed the name of the company to New Triumph Co. Ltd, which later changed its name to Triumph Cycle Co. Ltd. Having his main investor is John Dunlop, a Scottish veterinarian who has a patent on pneumatic tires. Then there is the name of a German engineer, Mauritz Schulte who joined Triump.

When Triumph entered the curator in 1983, John Bloor bought the name and manufacturing rights from the Official Receiver. The new manufacturing plants and designs that were unable to compete against Japan, so Bloor decided to re-launch Triumph immediately. Initially, the old Bonneville production was continued under license by Les Harris of Spares Racing, in Newton Abbot, Devon, to bridge the gap between the end of the old company and the beginning of the new company. During the five years from 1983, around 14 were built a week at the peak of production. In the United States, because of problems with insurance, the Harris Bonnevilles were never imported.

Bloor began working on the assembly of the new Triumph, hiring several former group designers to start working on new models. The team visited Japan on a tour of its competitors’ facilities and became determined to adopt Japanese manufacturing techniques and especially a new generation of computer-controlled machines. In 1985, Triumph bought the first set of equipment to start working, in secret, on a new prototype model. In 1987, the company completed the first engine. In 1988, Bloor funded the construction of a new factory at the 10-acre site (40,000 m 2) in Hinckley, Leicestershire. Bloor put between £ 70 million and £ 100 million to the company between buying the brand and even breaking it in 2000.

At the same time as production capacity increased, Bloor formed a new network of export distributors. He has previously made two subsidiaries, Triumph Deutschland GmbH and Triumph France SA. In 1994 Bloor created the Triumph America Ltd Motorcycle.

Schulte then convinced Bettmann that he had to design and produce his own products. In 1888, Triumph finally bought an old ribbon-making factory in Coventry and then the factory was set up to make bicycles.

In 1895, Schulte successfully imported one of the motorbikes made by Hildebrand und Wolfmuller to study the construction of the machine. Then in 1902, the history of Triumph motorcycles finally began with the company issuing its first motorcycle. Production of Triumph’s first motorcycle equipped with Minerva’s Belgian 2-HP engine. Within one year, Triumph was able to sell 500 units of motorbikes.

Finally, in 1905, it was an achievement, for the Triumph company, they were able to start production of motorcycles of their own design. Supported by a 3-HP engine and has a top speed of 45 Mph. In 1910, Triumph made a big jump. With the “free engine” which is the first clutch motor that allows the user to start the engine by standing.

When World War I began to rage. In 1914, a colonel named Claude Holbrook proposed Triumph as a supplier of motorbikes for the British and their allies. And during World War I, Triumph successfully sold around 30,000 units of motorcycles.

With a focus on the design and product history sector, Triumph motorcycles started with a premium motorbike manufacturer in the UK, which is now a huge success worldwide.

The triumph of a British motorcycle manufacturer named Triumph Motorcycles began in 1883, when a man named Siegfried Bettmann moved to Coventry, England from the city of Nuremberg, Germany.

At first Bettmann did not directly make a motorbike manufacturing factory, but instead an import-export company by the name of the company S. Bettmann & Co. Import Export Agency. Bettmann imported sewing machines from Germany and also had a side business selling a badged bicycle named “Bettmann”.

In 1887, a company run by Bettmann underwent a transformation, Bettmann changed the name of the company to New Triumph Co. Ltd, which later changed its name to Triumph Cycle Co. Ltd. Having his main investor is John Dunlop, a Scottish veterinarian who has a patent on pneumatic tires. Then there is the name of a German engineer, Mauritz Schulte who joined Triump.

Schulte then convinced Bettmann that he had to design and produce his own products. In 1888, Triumph finally bought an old ribbon-making factory in Coventry and then the factory was set up to make bicycles.

In 1895, Schulte successfully imported one of the motorbikes made by Hildebrand und Wolfmuller to study the construction of the machine. Then in 1902, the history of Triumph motorcycles finally began with the company issuing its first motorcycle. Production of Triumph’s first motorcycle equipped with Minerva’s Belgian 2-HP engine. Within one year, Triumph was able to sell 500 units of motorbikes.

Finally, in 1905, it was an achievement, for the Triumph company, they were able to start production of motorcycles of their own design. Supported by a 3-HP engine and has a top speed of 45 Mph. In 1910, Triumph made a big jump. With the “free engine” which is the first clutch motor that allows the user to start the engine by standing.

When World War I began to rage. In 1914, a colonel named Claude Holbrook proposed Triumph as a supplier of motorbikes for the British and their allies. And during World War I, Triumph successfully sold around 30,000 units of motorcycles.

With the collapse of the Wall Street stock market in 1929. This caused Triumph to be forced to sell a subsidiary located in Germany. The climax, in 1939, was due to financial problems that were wrapped around the company. Then Triumph was bought by Standard Motor owned by John Sangster. Interestingly here, the figure of John Sangster is the owner of Ariel Motor, which at the time was one of Triumph’s competitors in building motorcycles.

After a long journey and experienced ups and downs, in 1983 a British businessman named John Bloor, took over Triumph Motorcycles Ltd. John Bloor tried to maintain Triumph as a legendary authentic British motorcycle. With the philosophy of “For the Ride” which means driving comfortably, which was pinned to Triumph, John Bloor began a campaign to bring Triumph back to its peak.

There are three important elements that are used as a reference for the history of the Triumph motorbike as a ride that is comfortable to drive, namely an elegant appearance, an ergonomic and strong construction design or frame, and reliable engine performance. One unique feature that is often felt by Triumph riders is stability. At low speeds, Triumph riders can continue without having to lower their legs.

Bloor devotes high attention to the design and production sector. With an allocation of 50 percent of the total 2,000 employees owned by Triumph at that time, worked in the Research and Development sector. With a focus on that area, the results are 26 models with a wide variety of product segments, which include adventure, classic, cruiser, roadster, super sport and touring.

With a focus on the design and product history sector, Triumph motorcycles started with a premium motorbike manufacturer in the UK, which is now a huge success worldwide.

The triumph of a British motorcycle manufacturer named Triumph Motorcycles began in 1883, when a man named Siegfried Bettmann moved to Coventry, England from the city of Nuremberg, Germany.

At first Bettmann did not directly make a motorbike manufacturing factory, but instead an import-export company by the name of the company S. Bettmann & Co. Import Export Agency. Bettmann imported sewing machines from Germany and also had a side business selling a badged bicycle named “Bettmann”.

In 1887, a company run by Bettmann underwent a transformation, Bettmann changed the name of the company to New Triumph Co. Ltd, which later changed its name to Triumph Cycle Co. Ltd. Having his main investor is John Dunlop, a Scottish veterinarian who has a patent on pneumatic tires. Then there is the name of a German engineer, Mauritz Schulte who joined Triump.

Schulte then convinced Bettmann that he had to design and produce his own products. In 1888, Triumph finally bought an old ribbon-making factory in Coventry and then the factory was set up to make bicycles.

In 1895, Schulte successfully imported one of the motorbikes made by Hildebrand und Wolfmuller to study the construction of the machine. Then in 1902, the history of Triumph motorcycles finally began with the company issuing its first motorcycle. Production of Triumph’s first motorcycle equipped with Minerva’s Belgian 2-HP engine. Within one year, Triumph was able to sell 500 units of motorbikes.

Finally, in 1905, it was an achievement, for the Triumph company, they were able to start production of motorcycles of their own design. Supported by a 3-HP engine and has a top speed of 45 Mph. In 1910, Triumph made a big jump. With the “free engine” which is the first clutch motor that allows the user to start the engine by standing.

When World War I began to rage. In 1914, a colonel named Claude Holbrook proposed Triumph as a supplier of motorbikes for the British and their allies. And during World War I, Triumph successfully sold around 30,000 units of motorcycles.

With the collapse of the Wall Street stock market in 1929. This caused Triumph to be forced to sell a subsidiary located in Germany. The climax, in 1939, was due to financial problems that were wrapped around the company. Then Triumph was bought by Standard Motor owned by John Sangster.

Interestingly here, the figure of John Sangster is the owner of Ariel Motor, which at the time was one of Triumph’s competitors in building motorcycles.

After a long journey and experienced ups and downs, in 1983 a British businessman named John Bloor, took over Triumph Motorcycles Ltd. John Bloor tried to maintain Triumph as a legendary authentic British motorcycle. With the philosophy of “For the Ride” which means driving comfortably, which was pinned to Triumph, John Bloor began a campaign to bring Triumph back to its peak.

There are three important elements that are used as a reference for the history of the Triumph motorbike as a ride that is comfortable to drive, namely an elegant appearance, an ergonomic and strong construction design or frame, and reliable engine performance. One unique feature that is often felt by Triumph riders is stability. At low speeds, Triumph riders can continue without having to lower their legs.

Bloor devotes high attention to the design and production sector. With an allocation of 50 percent of the total 2,000 employees owned by Triumph at that time, worked in the Research and Development sector. With a focus on that area, the results are 26 models with a wide variety of product segments, which include adventure, classic, cruiser, roadster, super sport and touring.

That way, Triumph began to develop into a premium motorcycle manufacturer with the most complete product line. The effect, Triumph motorcycle sales worldwide skyrocketed, and broke new records with sales numbers touching 50 thousand units. In his home country, England. Triumph became the number one motorcycle brand with a market share of 19% of total motorcycle sales in the UK.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *